Bombshell: Hillary Linked to Child Rape Network, Emails Suggest


Evidence of child sex would explain why FBI reopened investigation into Hillary

Kit Daniels
 Prison Planet.com
 Nov. 5, 2016

Strange “hot dog” and “Beanie Baby” emails leaked from the Clinton campaign may contain code words for pedophilia or other illegal activities, according to investigative researchers.

Additionally, an anonymous FBI source said to watch for code words for “weapons, drugs and people” in the emails released by Wikileaks – and evidence of child sex trafficking would explain why the FBI reopened their investigation into Hillary Clinton despite severe political blowback.

One email in particular about a “Beanie Baby” fire sell sent to the Clinton campaign from the Georgetown Law announcements board seems innocent at first, but raises questions upon investigation:

Georgetown Law Faculty and Staff, My parents are visiting this weekend, and I need to sell my enormous collection of beanie babies! I’ve approximately 480 little creatures of joy, and I’m selling each one for $20.00. You must buy all 480, though. It is a collection (not an auction)… They are very respectful and amicable with one another, and they are (for the most part) cat and dog friendly. Some are sassier than others, naturally. Please let me know! My parents can’t find out.

If you take the email at face value, a middle-aged lawyer wants $9600 up front for 480 stuffed animals who are “cat and dog friendly” and have human personalities (“some are sassier than others”) because his “parents are visiting this weekend” and they “can’t find out.”

But here’s the thing: the Beanie Baby fad died out over a decade ago. Most Beanie Babies are now worth way less than $20 a piece, which is the advertised price in this email.

This would be like someone buying 500 baseball cards at $20 a piece without knowing if any of them are even valuable. One card might be worth $100, and the rest only a penny.

And typically, when someone is selling an entire lot of collectable items, such as baseball cards or rare Beanie Babies, he’ll list a few of the most rare, collectable ones in the lot, but you don’t see that in this email.

Ask youself, would you pay $9600 for a collection of baseball cards that the seller could have just easily picked up at the grocery store for $10? Of course not.

“Random beanie babies (since author didn’t bother to mention any specific dolls to justify the valuation) – in a large lot like that would barely fetch $1000,” one researcher said.

beanies

Besides, who in the hell is going to spend nearly $10K all at once for a load of 90s-era stuffed animals which could fill a small apartment? Unless you’re reselling them on eBay, but like I said, most of them aren’t worth $20.

Another red flag: the asking price is just below $10K, and according to the Bank Secrecy Act, anyone who receives more than $10K in a cash transaction must report the exchange to the IRS.

This is what got former House Speaker – and admitted child molester – Dennis Hastert caught when he attempted to make a payoff to keep someone quiet about his crimes.

Going back to the email, it’d also seem easier to just rent out a storage unit to store “Beanie Babies” instead of trying to sell nearly 500 of them all at once to middle-aged political insiders – a very narrow range of potential buyers who probably don’t collect stuffed animals like their grandmothers.

The seller attached a picture of a Beanie Baby collection to the email, but using a reverse image search, the image appeared to be a publicly-available photo that appeared on several blogs as far back as Oct. 2014 and perhaps even earlier. The seller’s email was dated June 2015.

A Vietnam-era political activist said the email was similar to the “code word” ads he used to place in newspaper classifieds.

“We frequently had to move ‘packages’ of different types (political materials, stolen/copied files from gov’t agencies, and some groups moved draft dodgers through Boston going to Canada, of course), and we’d place our ads in the classified sections of free newspapers and on bulletin boards,” he said. “Heck, I still remember my group’s code words. The more things change, the more they stay the same.”

As far as the 480 Beanie Babies for sale, he said 480 was likely also a code word and not an actual quantity.

“I went with 48 rather than 480 because back in the day we’d add a 0 to things as a code for a ‘priority item’ – if something absolutely positively HAD to get there overnight [or dumped in a hurry due to a police raid,] it was 0. If this could wait a day, it would have been 481, 2 days 482, etc.”

“The ’48’ was, for us, typically a type of item.”

And a former weed dealer said this is how he’d translate the email (the original shown first):

Georgetown Law Faculty and Staff, My parents are visiting this weekend, and I need to sell my enormous collection of beanie babies! I’ve approximately 480 little creatures of joy, and I’m selling each one for $20.00. You must buy all 480, though. It is a collection (not an auction)… They are very respectful and amicable with one another, and they are (for the most part) cat and dog friendly. Some are sassier than others, naturally. Please let me know! My parents can’t find out.

Georgetown, the heat is on this weekend, and I need to get rid of my stash. I’ve got about 48 little “creatures” (I don’t even want to speculate) and they go for $20,000 each. You must get all 48, they’re priced as a lot, not per item. They’re ok to keep together, (cats and dogs only makes me think men and women), and some are intense. Hit me up on the down low.

Other strange emails sent to Clinton campaign chair John Podesta include cryptic references to “pizza,” “hot dogs,” “pasta” and “walnuts,” which are fueling speculation they are code words from criminal activity – including child molestation:

http://www.prisonplanet.com/bombshell-hillary-linked-to-child-rape-network-emails-suggest.html

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