“Learn to think like the Larisa prosecutors,” a helpful tip from a Greek


A Greek physiotherapist, working in London, has just given me the tip of trying to think like the prosecutors in Larisa to help me better communicate with them and crack my case.

She drew a diagram on a piece of paper to show me how Greeks typically think in a helpful attempt at promoting cross cultural understanding.

She drew a dot, and then a circle that went round and round the dot. This represented thought processes that always skirt the real issue even, even as the country is collapsing around the Greeks in a similar kind of spiral form.

Taking up her tip, I decided to draw my own diagram of how I think Greeks think, at least from my experience of the Larisa prosecutors, police and lawyers, in order to start to think like them and make progress on my case.

The top part of the diagram shows how I think I think.

There is a straight line between A and B.

The lower part shows how I think Larisa prosecutors think.

Thinking

There is an A and a B but the line between them is somewhat convoluted and somehow the goal of B always seems out of reach.

So if my next post starts to soundrather  complicated, shall we say, with no clear topic or context, with references to random facts, making leaps, yes, gymnastic jumps, of logic, and yet it rambles on and on, taking right and left turnings, mentioning now this detail, now that, forgetting this fact, denying that, overlooking that, recalling something with no bearing on the issue at hand and repeating that over and over….well, you know I have succeeded.

I am starting to think like a Greek prosecutor and that might bring me one step closer to…going to the court again to testify again, and hand in the same evidence again, and present the same facts again, and the same arguments again round and round again and again in a meandering, off the point, circuitous ramble (but delivered with a deferential, please wipe your feet on me attitude so agreeable to justice officials here) …

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It was very reassuring to talk to a Greek person who works in London and who understood the concepts of professionalism, fair play and dialogue. She explained to me all these things are totally unknown in Greece. Study in Greece is a joyless burden. Work in Greece has no dignity, she said. Depressed workers put on a show of arrogance and pride to hide their disappointment at their feelings of not having any value. Work is just an obligation to whatever political party helped someone get a position, she suggested.

Anyway, it was very helpful to see her perspective on things. For most of the Larisa prosecutors my approach and way of thinking must be totally alien just as their way of thinking is alien to me. In fact, we almost always seem to be talking past each other.

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